2 Chronicles 34:3
In the eighth year of his reign, while he was still young, Josiah began to seek the God of David his forefather, and in the twelfth year he began to cleanse Judah and Jerusalem of the high places, the Asherah poles, the carved idols, and the cast images.
Sermons
Early PietyA Gatty, M.A.2 Chronicles 34:3
Early PietyH. Kollock, D. D.2 Chronicles 34:3
Early PietyEssex Congregational Remembrancer2 Chronicles 34:3
Early Piety and its AdvantagesJ. Wolfendale.2 Chronicles 34:3
Early Piety Exemplified in JosiahSketches of Four Hundred Sermons2 Chronicles 34:3
JosiahJames Wells, M.A.2 Chronicles 34:3
Piety in YouthW. Clarkson 2 Chronicles 34:3
Seeking After GodRobert Stevenson.2 Chronicles 34:3
Well StartedF. Hastings.2 Chronicles 34:3
Youth the Best Time to Serve GodChristian Age2 Chronicles 34:3
Josiah the GoodT. Whitelaw 2 Chronicles 34:1-7
Early PietyGriffith Johns.2 Chronicles 34:1-8
Importance of Early PietyW. M. Taylor, D.D.2 Chronicles 34:1-8
Josiah the Old-Fashioned Young ManD. Davies.2 Chronicles 34:1-8
Josiah's Early PietyMonday Club Sermons2 Chronicles 34:1-8
The Example of JoashT. Hughes.2 Chronicles 34:1-8


2 Chronicles 34:3 (first part)
That Josiah "while he was yet young... began to seek after the God of David his father" is to us an interesting fact; it provides an example to the young and an incentive to those who have charge of their welfare. Respecting piety in youth it is well to consider -

I. HOW MUCH THERE IS TO COMMEND IT.

1. All life belongs to God, and therefore this part of it. Unto him who gave us our existence and all our powers, and in whom we live and move and have our being, surely the whole of our life belongs; it cannot be withheld without wrong, without keeping back the "glory due to his Name," the gratitude and the love and the service due to himself. Therefore does this part of it along with the rest. Audit is certain that when life is past and we come to have it in review we shall be most happy in the thought, if we can but cherish it, that our youth also was spent in the fear of God, in the love and service of Jesus Christ.

"'Twill please us to look back and see
That our whole lives were thine."

2. Each period of life has its own peculiar offering to bring. If age has its patience and submissiveness, and if elderliness has its experience, and if prime has the fulness of its strength for service, and if young manhood has its hopefulness and its ardour, then has youth also its especial offering to bring to its Redeemer; it has its affectionateness, its trustfulness, its docility, its readiness to obey, its beauty. Truly, the "flower when offered in the bud:' is "no vain sacrifice."

3. It saves the growth of injurious weeds in the garden of the soul. When the sense of sacred obligation is absent, youth is apt to let various evil habits grow up - habits which choke much that is good, which constitute a serious drawback to Christian worth, and which require much effort and much time also for their extraction. But when the curly days are spent in the service and in the friendship of Christ, his holy will being the one rule of the heart and life, such evil habits are unformed, and all the after-days are stronger and better and more beautiful for their absence.

4. Each period in life is a stepping-stone to the next, is a preparation for the next. We sow in youth what we reap ill young manhood; as we go on our way we gather in the harvest of the thought and toil of the years that came before it. But this applies to our moral and spiritual character more perfectly than to anything else. How, then, can we afford to lose the great advantage of building up from the beginning? Our manhood will be much the weaker for an ill-spent youth, and much the stronger for a well-spent one. Our whole life will be greatly impoverished by the one, greatly enriched by the other.

5. Godly youth is a source of pure and deep joy to those whom the young should be most desirous of pleasing - to those that have loved them and served them with tenderest solicitude and unfailing devotion.

II. OUR DUTY IN REGARD TO IT.

1. To abstain most carefully from forcing it. No deadlier injury can be done to the young than forcing a religious habit; constraining them to affect a language and to make a profession which is unreal, which will soon break down, and which will leave the heart far less open to all heavenly influences than it would have been.

2. To encourage it in every way that is in our power; more particularly by the exhibition of a consistent life and the manifestation of a loving spirit toward them. Whom we win for ourselves we may lead to our Lord.

III. THE WISDOM AND THE DUTY OF THE YOUNG. This is to enter the service of Jesus Christ without delay. He does not require of them anything they cannot offer. He does not demand of them that they should use the language or do the work which is appropriate, to other conditions; he asks them to receive him as their Divine Teacher, as their Divine Friend, as their Divine Lord. He asks them to trust, to love, to serve him to the height of their present power. This they can do; this they should do; this they will be truly and deeply wise if they do. "Seek ye the Lord while he may be found, call ye upon him while he is near." - C.









For in the eighth year of his reign, while he was yet young, he began to seek after the God of David.
I. WHY WE SHOULD SEEK AFTER GOD.

1. We are by nature without God.

2. To be without God is certain misery.

3. In God alone we can obtain peace and rest.

II. HOW WE ARE TO SEEK AFTER GOD.

1. With respect to God Himself. Josiah sought — not the God of nature; not the God of Providence; but "the God of David his father." And why? David was a type of Christ; the covenant made with David a type of the covenant of grace, and "the sure mercies of David," symbols of the better blessings of the New Covenant.

2. With respect to ourselves. By repentance, faith, and obedience.

III. WHEN WE ARE TO SEEK AFTER GOD.

(Robert Stevenson.)

I. ENLIGHTENED PIETY CONSISTS IN SEEKING GOD.

1. Earnestly.

2. Promptly.

3. Perseveringly.

II. SEEKING GOD EARLY WILL CONDUCE TO HONOUR.

1. It keeps alive religious susceptibilities.

2. It saves from snares.

3. It brings eminent usefulness in life.

4. It prepares for happy death.

(J. Wolfendale.)

Christian Age.
Let us think of some reasons why we should seek God in childhood.

1. The first reason is because youth is the best time.

2. Another reason is because youth is the most important time. "Satisfy us early with Thy goodness, that we may be glad and rejoice all our days." What seems a slight mistake at the beginning may make a terrible difference at the end.

3. Another reason for seeking God in early life is because it is noblest to do right now, not to wait until we have spent most of our life doing wrong.

(Christian Age.)

I. THAT ANY SOUL SHOULD BEGIN EARLY TO SEEK THE LORD, IS AN EVENT THAT WOULD BE THOUGHT UNIMPORTANT BY SOME, BUT IT IS CHRONICLED IN HEAVEN.

II. EVERY MAN MUST SEARCH CAREFULLY HIS OWN HEART, AND DETERMINE WHETHER THE DEFINITE DESIRE AFTER GOD IS THERE OR NOT. The desire is equivalent to spiritual sight. To help to build up righteousness is serving God.

III. SOME WILL SAY: "BUT I HAVE NO SUCH OPPORTUNITIES AS JOSIAH." Have you sought them? Is not influence on relatives, friends, comrades, fellow-workers an opportunity? Can you never seize suitable occasions for uttering a Christian sentence or scowling on a social sin?

IV. A FURTHER OBJECTION IS "BUT I HAVE SO MANY DIFFICULTIES IN MY WAY, THAT I CAN DO NOTHING USEFUL." Think of those Josiah must have met with.

V. OTHERS SAY: "BUT I NEVER HAD ANY SPECIAL CALL TO SERVE GOD." What if parents, or brothers, or sisters, or friend never mentioned it? Have you never heard it in your heart, and cannot you hear it now? The very passage of time calls you to serve God.

VI. THOSE WHO BEGIN LIFE WITH CHRIST as Saviour, Guide, Helper, Eternal Friend, and who are honestly trying to serve Him, MAY BE SURE THAT HE WILL REJOICE OVER THEM, AND REMEMBER THEM, EVEN THOUGH THEM NAMES MAY NOT BE EMBLAZONED ON ANY GREAT WORLD-ROLL OF HONOUR.

VII. SOME ARE CONSCIOUS THAT THEY ARE NOT MAKING A GOOD BEGINNING OF LIFE. They are drifting onwards and towards dangerous rapids and a deathly abyss. Christ comes to save and to give a fresh start. This is an opportunity which is worth seizing.

(F. Hastings.)

I. WHAT JOSIAH TURNED FROM.

1. From what is familiarly called "the way of the world."

2. From the carnal appetites of youth, which craved to be pampered by their gratification.

3. From all vanities of the imagination.

4. From the exercise of power, before weighing its responsibilities.

5. From false friends and evil counsellors.

6. From the delusions of the gaudy appendages of a worldly Court.

II. WHAT JOSIAH TURNED TO. He fixed his heart and the faith of his soul upon God, as his —

1. Friend.

2. Father.

3. Guide.

III. HE WAS FAITHFUL AND PIOUS FROM HIS EARLIEST DAYS.

(A Gatty, M.A.)

I. NOTHING IS MORE AMIABLE IN ITSELF, OR MORE PLEASING TO GOD, THAN EARLY PIETY.

II. YOUTH IS A SEASON IN WHICH YOU HAVE THE GREATEST ADVANTAGES FOR CULTIVATING THE PRINCIPLES OF PIETY, AND THE GREATEST NEED OF RELIGION, AS A DEFENCE FROM TEMPTATION AND DANGERS.

III. BY EARLY PIETY YOU WILL PREPARE TRANQUILITY AND JOY FOR OLD AGE, WHILST BY AN OPPOSITE CONDUCT YOU WILL FILL IT WITH REMORSE AND FEARS.

IV. REGARD TO THE FEELINGS OF ALL PIOUS PERSONS IN THE CHURCH UNIVERSAL, A RESPECT TO THE HAPPINESS OF YOUR PARENTS, SHOULD INDUCE YOU EARLY TO DEVOTE YOURSELVES TO GOD.

V. ON YOUR CONDUCT IN YOUTH, YOUR SALVATION OR PERDITION ALMOST INFALLIBLY DEPEND.

(H. Kollock, D. D.)

Essex Congregational Remembrancer.
I. We shall briefly notice THE STRIKING EXAMPLE OF YOUTHFUL PIETY HERE PRESENTED TO OUR VIEW.

1. He was a decidedly religious character.

2. His genuine religion commenced at an early period.

3. An exemplary life and conversation abundantly proved the sincerity and ardour of his piety.

4. Josiah's early piety is adduced as the pledge if not the basis of his future eminence in religion.

5. Josiah and his country reaped great advantages from his early devotedness to God.

II. We shall produce ARGUMENTS URGING UPON ALL OUR YOUNG PEOPLE THE EXEMPLIFICATION OF SIMILAR DECIDED PIETY.

1. A due regard to your personal welfare.

2. The plea of relative usefulness —

(1)In the family.

(2)The social circle.

(3)The Church.

3. Many whom you dearly love feel deeply interested in your spiritual welfare.

(1)Parents.

(2)Ministers.

4. The compassionate Saviour not only claims but kindly encourages youthful piety.

(Essex Congregational Remembrancer.)

Sketches of Four Hundred Sermons.
I. JOSIAH IMITATED DAVID.

1. God was David's teacher.

2. God was David's comfort.

3. God was David's delight.

4. God was David's defence.

II. THE MANNER HOW HE SOUGHT AFTER GOD. He sought God —

1. From a deep conviction that his conduct and the conduct of Israel generally was highly offensive to God, and that they were exposed to imminent peril.

2. In deep self-abasement of soul.

3. By destroying the idols out of the land.

4. By restoring God's true worship and frequenting it.

5. With all his heart (2 Kings 23:25).

III. THE PERIOD OF LIFE WHEN HE DID IT.

(Sketches of Four Hundred Sermons.)

Josiah was —

I. AN EARLY SEEKER. Our Queen wears a velvet cap under her crown lest it should hurt her head: this eight-year-old king had more need of such a covering. The crown is a heavy burden for young soldiers. Yet there have been younger kings than Josiah. An old Norse king was called Olaf Lapking because he was king while on his mother's lap. Royal boyhood is often poisoned boyhood. The people of Israel around little Josiah were doing worse than the heathen. The sins and sorrows of that time are described in the Lamentations of Jeremiah, whose heart they had broken, Yet Josiah at the age of eight did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, and at sixteen began to seek the God of his father David with more earnestness than ever. God calls us to seek Him earlier. In our Latin exercises there was a story about a simpleton sitting one evening at the river's brink. A traveller coming up wished his company in crossing. "No," he replied, "I am waiting till the river flows past." The tiny stream of difficulties between you and Christ won't flow past, but will flow on, and broaden and deepen, till it grows like an angry torrent, swollen with winter floods, that threatens to sweep down the old man who would ford it.

II. JOSIAH WAS ALSO A HEARTY HATER OF EVIL. He did not hate in others the sins he practised himself, He was not like the Czar of Russia who used to say, "I reform my country, and am not able to reform myself." Dr. Arnold used to say, "Commend me to boys who love God and hate evil." Love without hate makes a mere milksop, and Christ's disciples are to be the salt, and not the sugar of society. We need boys who will hate all evil as young Hannibal hated Rome. The young Christian ought to be the sworn foe of the kingdom of darkness.

III. JOSIAH WAS A REAL HERO. A hero is one who, in doing duty, scorns great dangers. He had the spirit of , who replied to the threats of the Empress Eudoxia, "I fear nothing but sin." Josiah's love for the Bible would open his soul to all the best influences from the heroic lives of Noah, Abraham, Joseph, Moses, Samuel and Gideon. Thus was developed in him what Dr. Chalmers calls "the expulsive power of a new affection."

IV. JOSIAH WAS MISSED AND MOURNED WHEN HE DIED. There is a night in Spain called "the sad night": and so in the history of Judah, the death of Josiah was "the sad day." The Rabbis say that "the memory of him was like costly incense, and sweet as honey in the mouths of all."

(James Wells, M.A.)

Links
2 Chronicles 34:3 NIV
2 Chronicles 34:3 NLT
2 Chronicles 34:3 ESV
2 Chronicles 34:3 NASB
2 Chronicles 34:3 KJV

2 Chronicles 34:3 Bible Apps
2 Chronicles 34:3 Parallel
2 Chronicles 34:3 Biblia Paralela
2 Chronicles 34:3 Chinese Bible
2 Chronicles 34:3 French Bible
2 Chronicles 34:3 German Bible

2 Chronicles 34:3 Commentaries

Bible Hub
2 Chronicles 34:2
Top of Page
Top of Page