Exodus 6:6
Therefore tell the Israelites: 'I am the LORD, and I will bring you out from under the yoke of the Egyptians and deliver you from their bondage. I will redeem you with an outstretched arm and with mighty acts of judgment.
Sermons
A Divine Commentary on a Divine NameJ. Orr Exodus 6:1-9
The Message to Afflicted IsraelJ. Urquhart Exodus 6:2-8
A Stretched Out ArmT. S. Millington.Exodus 6:6-8
Israel and Pharaoh: Types of the New and Old ManG. Wagner.Exodus 6:6-8
The GuaranteeBritish WeeklyExodus 6:6-8


I. THE WORD TO THE LEADER: vers. 2-5. The message must be from faith to faith. The heart of God's servant must first be revived ere he can impart strength to the people.

1. He is reminded of God's faithfulness: "I am Jehovah." We cannot grasp this truth without deliverance from fear.

2. The darkness will only make God's glory shine out the more resplendently. Their present sufferings will mark a new era in God's revelation of himself. Known before as the Almighty, he will now reveal himself as Jehovah, "the faithful One," who remembers and fulfils his promises.

3. Having grasped the truth regarding God's faithfulness he is led back to the promises by which the Lord has bound himself.

4. The assurance of present sympathy and speedy deliverance. He has heard their groaning and called to remembrance his pledged word. To dwell in these truths is to possess light and power. God's word will then be a joy to our hearts, and will be in our lips consolation and strength for the fainting ones around us.

II. THE WORD TO THE PEOPLE: vers. 6-8.

1. It is shut in between the reiterated assurance, "I am Jehovah," vers. 6-9. For them, too, the truth to rest in is God's faithfulness.

2. The deliverance will be accompanied by the revelation of God's terribleness (ver. 6). Israel never forgot those days, and never will.

3. God will wed them to himself. He does not deliver us and then leave us: "I will take you to me for a people and I will be to you a God."

4. He will fulfil all the promises and give them the land for a heritage. This is the Gospel message: Our bonds will be broken - God will bind us to himself and give us his people's heritage. Have we received it? Is it a living hope, an abiding joy to us? - U.









I will bring you out.
British Weekly.
1. God is able to deliver His people.

2. God is able to lead His people.

3. God is able to bring His people home.

I. REDEMPTION IS POSSIBLE, ALTHOUGH THE DIFFICULTIES ARE GREAT, BECAUSE GOD IS ITS AUTHOR. On the Divine side —

1. Satisfaction to the throne in the obedience of Christ; and on the human side —

2. The sanctification of man through the blood of Jesus.

II. THE MAGNITUDE OF REDEMPTION IS LESS THAN THE DIVINE RESOURCES. God is able to supply —

1. Strength;

2. Patience; and —

3. Preservation for the journey.

III. GOD CAN FULFIL ALL PROSPECTIVE DESIRES IN HEAVEN.

(British Weekly.)

I. ISRAEL'S POSITION IN EGYPT. One of great and increasing trial. Iron bondage, occasioned instrumentally by cruelty and jealousy of Pharaoh. Ordained of God to wean them from Egypt, and make them long for promised land.

II. THE JUDGMENT ON EGYPT. Real contest between kingdom of light and kingdom of darkness. Satan has supernatural power; and in order to deceive Pharaoh, and harden his heart, he gave the magicians power, as far as he could (for there is a limit to his power), to work miracles of deception in imitation of miracles of truth. A miracle does not necessarily prove a man comes from God; but only that he is connected with some higher power — one of two kingdoms. It is the morality of the miracle, and the holiness of the doctrine it is meant to attest, that proves it to be from God.

III. THE BEARING OF THESE ON THE CHRISTIAN'S LIFE. See Romans 7:9, 24: State of awakened soul; o]d man and new, with conflict between them; new man often oppressed, old man often dominant though under judgment.

(G. Wagner.)

The significance of this figure, "a stretched-out arm," must have been well understood by the Israelites. The deities of the Egyptians were represented with outstretched arms, as symbols of irresistible might. In the hieroglyphics which may yet be seen upon the obelisk at Heliopolis, and with which the Children of Israel must have been familiar, two outstretched arms occur as part of the title of one of the kings, Osirtasen Racheperka, with this meaning, "Osirtasen, the sun, is might!" God's outstretched arm, therefore, is opposed to the king's; and He adds, "I will take you to Me for a people, and I will be to you a God; and ye shall know that I am the Lord your God, which bringeth you out from under the burden of the Egyptians." Moses must also have bethought him of the promise made to him upon the mountains: "See, I have made thee a god to Pharaoh": his outstretched arm was now endued with "might"; it was the instrument by which many of the plagues were brought upon the land, and by which at last Pharaoh and his host were overwhelmed.

(T. S. Millington.)

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